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History & Facts

History of the Lake

Stonewall Jackson Lake State Park was completed in 1990. The park and associated lake were a project of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who purchased the property to construct a flood control dam. A portion of the lake covered the former site of Roanoke, WV, which was completely flooded inover 60 feet of water. The finished dam was put in service in 1988. For more information, call 304-269-7400 or click here to email us.

Private and Public Sectors Working Together

Stonewall Resort is the first state park in the nation to be developed, constructed, financed and operated by a private developer in partnership with the state. This bold and pioneering initiative is now being heralded as a national model for public/private development. The project was completed in late 2002 after years of painstaking discussions and planning by the State of West Virginia, the US Army Corps of Engineers, Senator Robert C. Byrd and the Charleston-based development firm of McCabe-Henley LP.

The State of West Virginia invested $23 million and McCabe-Henley LP organized the private investment of $42 million to provide the total funding necessary to build the project. To provide relief to the state, Sen. Robert C. Byrd developed and passed single-purpose federal legislation in 1995 which erased $1.00 of debt for every $1.00 spend on the construction of facilities within the boundaries of the state park, giving West Virginia ownership of present and future park facilities. As a result of the $65 million investment, the State of West Virginia satisfied a $35 million debt to the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Cairns (KAR-ens)


The park is home to an interesting archeological curiosity. A total of 150 unique stone structures, called Cairns, are scattered throughout Stonewall State Park. Cairns are manmade structures, ranging from loose piles of stones to fully-formed stone towers.

The structures are found throughout the world, which is evidence of historic construction by a variety of cultures. Previously, they have been associated with navigation, natural resource indicators, fortification, burial markings and as indications of former battlefields. These mysterious structures have been remarkably difficult to date. Historians are unsure of who built the cairns or what their original purpose might have been. Some believe they might have been constructed by Native Americans.

Also, a 150-foot section of wall can be found at the park, running parallel to the Hevener's Orchard Trail. Local historians claim that the structures do not fit the pattern of fortification structures, ruling out the possibility of Civil War soldiers constructing them. For now, the origin of the stonework remains a mystery for both historians and archeologists.